S. Shabazz

S. Shabazz

YOUNG DREAMS HIGH STAKES

Theme: Unsafe

I had to take this photo, a lot of times when I’m out and I see the younger children practicing or playing football, I just have go and observe. This is where my heart was at one time, because I was one of those children that was taught that if “you run that football, you are going to make it out of here (the ghetto).” This is what I was taught all the way up to my freshman year at Murray State when I realized you have four running backs just like me, and you do not care about me as far as being the feature back. So then when my grades get bad, nobody is here to help me. All of the guys that I looked up to in high school, their either gone off to the military or their going off to college themselves. So nobody is here to grab me and let me know what I need to do. I think that we are the only race of people that teach our kids that this is the way out. It seems that little Forrest that lives in Prospect, knows he’s going to college when he’s born. These little Ray Ray’s and Pookie’s  (such as myself), this is how they get to college. I would have never earned a college experience if I did not play football because I would have never earned a scholarship to experience college. I had to take that picture “Young Dreams, High Stakes,” the stakes are the buildings over here (the city skyline), so we see the dome in the background. It’s the perfect setting to let you see what they are faced with, so it’s letting you see what they are faced with, the city right here in Louisville, KY. You have young dreams but high stakes. It’s almost like plantation when you play that sport, yea it opens up doors for discipline. I was disciplined real well, but I wasn’t disciplined by my father. I was disciplined by the slave master, he won the trophy when it was over, I made him and the school I played for look good. Young dreams, high stakes, I can really relate to it. There is a Pop Warner League and they asked me to coach. I really thought about it, I met with Maurice Clarette last year, he asked if I would ever get back into coaching, I told him no. People ask me at home when I go home, are you going to coach, no, because it is so much more that I can offer a young man to make it out here in life than running a football. What happens is, when you find out that you can’t run that football anymore, then you turn into people like myself. Now I’m a problem for my whole community and don’t even know it. This is represents unsafety, looking at that age, thinking back to high school and my first year of college reflecting.